14 July 2006

B36 News - 14 July 2006

Topping today's news is the lack of news from Muthanna. How is this good news? Think about it like this, the MSM let the transfer of security responsibility go largely unnoticed, or at best gave it far less play than it deserved. You'd think that you could trust the MSM to print any negative news comming from Muthanna in a heartbeat now that it's being touted as a success story. Ergo, no news from Muthanna is good news.
Cross Loading
Here's a story about how one battalion is solving the problem of convoy security. It's another story of how troops are getting the mission accomplished regardless of obstacles or situations.
“We don’t want to rely on combat arms to protect us; it takes them away from their mission,” said Sergeant 1st Class Mark Jordan, platoon NCOIC.

The platoon acts as protection for the combat logistics patrols and also performs duties as a quick response force. The QRF duties include being on call for all recovery missions and being prepared to respond quickly to a myriad of calls while on Forward Operating Base (FOB) Warrior. Platoon members are also trained in first aid and act as aide and litter teams.

Platoon members represent the many different military occupational specialties taken from the entire battalion, including refuelers, equipment operators, logistical specialists and medics.
(full story by Capt. Lyn Graves, 133rd MPAD posted in comments)
IA in Mosul Capture Terror Cell Leader
The Iraqi Army took over security responsibility for Mosul less than two weeks ago and they're already having an impact. Acting on tips provided by civilians, the IA captured six members of this cell including the leader. This is an example of how Iraqi civilians trust their military and are willing to work with them to get rid of terrorists. This is how we're winning.

Soldiers Save Innocent Wounded Iraqi Woman
While attending college classes, this woman was injured by shrapnel from a terrorist mortar. Though the injuries were minor, a previous case of lupus infection prevented the injury from healing and the woman's condition continued to deteriorate. This is when she was brought to the gate of FOB Rustamiyah in the hopes that the Soldiers there would be able to help. Not only was her life saved, but it was done in a manner that would accomodate her cultural norms by having only female Soldiers attend to her. But I guess since she survived it's not considered newsworthy by the MSM.

VBIED Attack Prevented
Vehicle Borne Improvised Explosive Devices, or VBIEDs, are more simply known as car bombs. Recently in Baghdad, Soldiers came upon two guys who were digging next to a van. Before the Soldiers could investigate, the two men jumped in the van and took off leaving behind various VBIED making materials. But that didn't matter. Not long after running from the ground troops, the van was spotted by a helicopter and subsequently blown up by an EOD team.

BAGHDAD — A Soldier from Combat Aviation Brigade, 4th Infantry Division, silhouettes against a blur of Baghdad city lights as he keeps vigil by the cargo door of a flying CH-47 Chinook helicopter June 19. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Rodney Foliente, 4th Inf. Div. PAO)

5 Comments:

Blogger bandit.three.six said...

Written by Capt. Lyn Graves, 133rd MPAD
KIRKUK, Iraq (22 June 2006) – Protecting the convoys that supply and equip the 101st Airborne Division is an important mission, and one group of Soldiers understands that importance and experiences the reality of protecting convoys every day.

Soldiers of the “Gun Platoon” A Company, 426th Brigade Support Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division risk their lives to protect vital supply lines and to ensure that the efforts of coalition Soldiers serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom continue.

“We don’t want to rely on combat arms to protect us; it takes them away from their mission,” said Sergeant 1st Class Mark Jordan, platoon NCOIC.

The platoon acts as protection for the combat logistics patrols and also performs duties as a quick response force. The QRF duties include being on call for all recovery missions and being prepared to respond quickly to a myriad of calls while on Forward Operating Base (FOB) Warrior. Platoon members are also trained in first aid and act as aide and litter teams.

Platoon members represent the many different military occupational specialties taken from the entire battalion, including refuelers, equipment operators, logistical specialists and medics.

Soldiers rotate in and out of the platoon every three to four months, with the rotation staggered to provide continuity. Some Soldiers, like Spc. Adam Holt, have spent more time in the platoon than with his regular MOS.

“Once we get back to the FOB, we also can work with the Soldiers from our regular MOS, like for instance I am a refueler, so I can go back to help those guys,” said Holt.

“When we are back on the FOB, we pitch in to help, all the different MOS Soldiers work together to make the whole operation smoother,” said Army Sergeant Douglas Tolliver.

Soldiers from four different companies have contributed to the team, so the gun platoon represents the entire battalion. Frequently the platoon represents the battalion at all hours of the day or night.

“Even on an off day, we can still go out as QRF,” explained Tolliver. “So we are always working.”

“I tell them on their off day to get some rest,” said Jordan.

Getting enough rest is an important order when considering the amount of work this platoon has done while in Iraq, as well as the training required prior to deploying.

The platoon’s training began at Joint Readiness Training Center in Fort Polk, La. and then continued with a more intense period of training in Kuwait before the final deployment to Kirkuk.

The training has prepared the gun platoon for many of the situations they have been tasked with during Operation Iraqi Freedom.

“We’ve secured numerous IED scenes,” said Jordan.

The platoon has also apprehended suspicious individuals, some of whom were carrying weapons. “We can also break off from the CLP [convoy logistics patrol] to chase someone down if need be,” added Jordan. “We are typically out of the gate within an hour of being called.”

“The convoys are important because they keep the equipment coming, and we protect the convoys,” said Spec. Don Nottingham.

426th Battalion Command Sergeant Major William Maben said, “Our gun platoon is why we have been successful with the CLPs. We are out there with a physical, visible presence.”

15:55  
Blogger andrea/pj's said...

i loved the story of
the iraqi woman seeking
help:)
u guys rock!!!!!
bandit,i plugged your
blog at patriotguard.org..
i have had a some great
responses!!!and alot
of people looking at
my comment:)
so if u lurkers are out
there,stop in and say
howdy!!

andrea/summer pj's
(andybabe)

19:23  
Blogger Mike H. said...

Ummm, howdy.

21:47  
Blogger andrea/pj's said...

smart ass,hehehehehehe

22:14  
Blogger WomanHonorThyself said...

wowza..thanks for the inspiration..I've worked with the guys n gals returnin from Iraq and ...this is jus the boost I needed...! Did I say wowza..lol.:)

03:34  

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