29 August 2006

B36 News - 29 August 2006

More than 1500 hits since I first posted my challenge and still no serious contender. I've seen replies to the challenge that readers have posted on various boards that try to discredit me, some even claim that I'm not really a Soldier, that I'm some teenager in high-school. Even though there have been plenty of attacks on me personally and on the decision to go to war, they have yet to put a significant dent in the fact that we're winning.

If you don't know what I'm talking about, read this and then read my challenge.

As for news, I decided to focus today on the humanitarian efforts that have been achieved here in the last week or so. News of Together Forward continues to be positive and even though the bad guys are hitting back at us, it still isn't stopping our progress.

40,000 Innocent Iraqis Get Free Medical Treatment
A large section of northern Iraq is controlled by the South Korean military and one of the many activities they conduct is a free hospital. In less than two years, this hospital has offered free service to 40,000 Iraqis. But I guess none of them were abused, raped, or murdered so I doubt if you'll be hearing about this in any of the broadcast or print media.

The hospital works on a ticket system where local clinics issue tickets to patients that entitle them to see the doctors and nurses at the South Korean hospital. Not only does this hospital treat patients, but they offer supplies and training to the local clinics so that when it's time to go they can maintain the same level of service.

Soccer Anyone?
In Mudiq, Iraq, a soccer fan, who just happens to be the commander of the 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment operating in the area, promised local children that if they cleaned up a local dump that he would supply the goals and soccer balls required to turn it into a soccer field. Ten days later he made good on his promise.
The Iraqi children got excited about the soccer field as soon as Marines started unloading the gear. A recreation area like this is rare in an urban neighborhood such as Mudiq.

“You should have seen the kids,” said Cpl. Mario O. Huerta, a 22-year-old from Dallas, who serves as platoon sergeant for Desgrosseilliers’ jump team. “I was patrolling up and down the street and the whole town was happy.”

Huerta said he could relate to the young soccer stars. He shares their passion for game.

“Soccer is my life,” he said. “I’m a soccer player, so if someone did that for me when I was a kid, I know it would make my day.”
(full story by LCPL Ray Lewis, RCT 5 posted in comments)
Innocent Iraqi Children Get New School
In Al Tina, Iraq, a Civil Affairs team just finished building a new school for local children.
by Sgt. Dennis Gravelle
138th MPAD


AL TINA, Iraq -- The primary focus of Civil Affairs teams in northern Iraq is helping the Iraqi people rebuild the infrastructure, from roads and bridges to renovating schools for children.

Local schools in the north are in need of several upgrades and renovations due to years of neglect. The renovations are needed to help the children learn in an environment more conducive to learning.

For the village Al Tina, Iraq, their school held a ribbon cutting ceremony to feature the grand opening on Aug. 22. On hand for the ceremony was the Mayor of Qayyarah, Muktar Ali Shahab, and Gen Ali, commander, 3rd Brigade, 2nd Iraqi Army Division.

CA teams hired a local contractor to get the project started. The contractor then hired local villagers to assist with the repairs. Hiring locals improves short-term employment in the area, while instilling pride and improving the educational environment.

Money to complete the project came from the Commanders Emergency Relief Fund, which helps local villages in the Ninevah Province, northern Iraq rebuild after years of neglect.

“CERP is a sub category under a funding called Iraqi Reconstruction & Relief Effort,” said Lisa Lawson, project engineer, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, gulf region north. “This is what Congress authorized to help restore Iraq.” Lawson is from Tulsa, Okla.

The school was formerly a hut-like structure, but now has fans, flushing toilets, a headmaster’s office, and most importantly, an environment that facilitates learning.

3 Comments:

Blogger bandit.three.six said...

Written by Lance Cpl. Ray Lewis, Regimental Combat Team 5

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MUDIQ, Iraq (Aug. 22, 2006) -- “Betio Bastards’” top officer stuck to his word.

Lt. Col. Todd S. Desgrosseilliers, battalion commander for 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, and his Jump Platoon Marines brought two soccer goals and armfuls of soccer balls to the kids of Mudiq Aug. 22.

“We promised to bring them, so we’re going to bring them out,” said Desgrosseilliers, from Auburn, Maine.

He guaranteed the sports supplies as a reward for transforming a local trash dump into a soccer field during a community assistance mission there ten days earlier.

The Iraqi children got excited about the soccer field as soon as Marines started unloading the gear. A recreation area like this is rare in an urban neighborhood such as Mudiq.

“You should have seen the kids,” said Cpl. Mario O. Huerta, a 22-year-old from Dallas, who serves as platoon sergeant for Desgrosseilliers’ jump team. “I was patrolling up and down the street and the whole town was happy.”

Huerta said he could relate to the young soccer stars. He shares their passion for game.

“Soccer is my life,” he said. “I’m a soccer player, so if someone did that for me when I was a kid, I know it would make my day.”

Huerta and his cousins used to play soccer as children during Easter gatherings at a park near his childhood home.

“I would always be ready for that,” he said. “I’d be ready to show off.”

Iraqi children were ready to put their skills on display too. Kids were more than anxious to kick around the checker-patterned inflated ball the Marines had in hand.

Children grabbed for the “footballs,” as they call it, but the Marines didn’t mind.

12:11  
Anonymous Solo said...

I'll never quite get people who have jumped aboard the hate America train. Is it better to see a school destroyed, than one built? Would they rather see people sick and suffering than recieving medical care, just to satisfy a morbid need to claim they were right, rather than admit they are wrong? Expect lots of name calling and tired rhetoric Bandit. It's all the haters have to work with. Ya'll just keep your eye on the winning and the hate everything crowd will slink away to lick their wounds. There are folks that hate any success but their own, and don't care who suffers in the proccess.

16:19  
Anonymous Anna said...

You guys are doing a great job over there no matter what our idiot MSM might say! Keep it up!

Stay safe and keep your head down!

16:55  

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