19 July 2006

B36 News - 19 July 2006

Am I starting to repeat myself here? I'm finding so much good news that I'm having difficulty tracking which stories I've already posted here. The good news just keeps coming!

Innocent Iraqi Children Get Beanie Babies, Teddy Bears
There are a lot of groups and individuals that truly support the troops and our Iraqi allies and show their support by sending packages. This story shows what typically happens with the things that get sent over here to be distributed to Iraqi children.
In the town, the Soldiers dismounted from their vehicles holding plastic bags full of toys. As the children caught sight of the items, they quickly began to gather in the courtyard of the school building.

Two lines of neatly-dressed girls sang a song with clapping motions for the Soldiers, as the mayor of the town presented Green with a Kurdish flag.

After the preliminary ceremonies were over, the Soldiers lined up to hand out the toys. The children came on in a rush, hoping for one of the soccer balls, or perhaps a certain Beanie Baby or teddy bear.
(full story by 101st Airborne Diviision (Air Assault) PAO posted in comments)
GI Phone Home
This story is particularly rewarding for me personally. Marines stationed in Al Asad recently had the opportunity to talk with their families and friends over a video-teleconference (VTC) system. This is typical of the kind of work that my Soldiers do. My troops and I aren't out there patrolling the streets of Baghdad and training ISF, but knowing that we provide direct support to those who do is a very rewarding feeling.
"The call went great," said Staff Sgt. Dennis L. Burkeen, staff noncommissioned officer-in-charge of airframes maintenance, VMA-513. "Being able to see your family is as close as we can come to being with them."

The family members back home are as excited as the service members are about the VTCs.

"The VTC was awesome," said Alesha, wife of Burkeen. "It was really great to let my kids see their daddy again.
(full story by Lance Cpl. Brian J. Holloran, 3rd Marine AW (Fwd) posted in comments)
IA Assumes More Battlespace
For those who don't know, when we talk about 'battlespace' we're refering to responsibility for securing an area. It's a lot like jurisdiction for police back in the states. For example, a policeman from New Jersey can't write traffic tickets in New York because it's outside his jurisdiction. When ISF assume battlespace they're taking security responsibility for the area under their jurisdiction.
The four companies of the Iraqi battalion marched in front of the review stand which included Martindale, Lt. Col. James Rice, deputy commanding officer, 3rd HBCT, and Commanding General Abdul Jabar Salah Rabah, commander, Iraqi 4th Division.

“These days are the new days of Iraq,” Abdul Jabar said. “Soldiers, be happy for this day. The people of Al Dujayl are proud of what you did for their protection.”
(full story by Pfc. Paul J. Harris, 3rd Heavy Brigade Combat Team posted in comments)

3 Comments:

Blogger bandit.three.six said...

Operation Helping Hands Brings Gifts to Children
Released by 101st Airborne Dividion (Air Assault) PAO
Task Force Band of Brothers

DAHUK, Iraq – Soldiers from across the 142nd Corps Support Battalion brought smiles and toys to children in one of Iraq’s northernmost provinces during a humanitarian assistance drop here.

“The 142nd enjoys this just as much as the kids enjoy it,” said Lt. Col. Ronald Green, battalion commander. “This will stay in the minds and hearts of my Soldiers.”

Soldiers handed out Beanie Babies, sports uniforms, soccer balls, teddy bears and candy, donated by a variety of American organizations, said Capt. John Smith, battalion chaplain.

Lake Zurich High School, in Lake Zurich, Ill., sent the school uniforms, as well as “boxes and boxes” of teddy bears, Smith said.

Green’s mother coordinated with a Dayton, Ohio, radio station in a charity drive which netted more than 4,000 Beanie Babies for Iraqi children.

In the town, the Soldiers dismounted from their vehicles holding plastic bags full of toys. As the children caught sight of the items, they quickly began to gather in the courtyard of the school building.

Two lines of neatly-dressed girls sang a song with clapping motions for the Soldiers, as the mayor of the town presented Green with a Kurdish flag.

After the preliminary ceremonies were over, the Soldiers lined up to hand out the toys. The children came on in a rush, hoping for one of the soccer balls, or perhaps a certain Beanie Baby or teddy bear.

Each child was to receive one toy. After receiving his or her Beanie Baby or other item, the Soldiers marked the child’s left hand with a smiley face.

Once all the gifts were given out, the Soldiers snapped a few last photos, said their last goodbyes and headed back to vehicles

“I believe we’ve made an impression on this village,” Green said “I think we were able to do a great thing.”
------------------------------------
'Flying Nightmares' Phone Home
AL ASAD, Iraq (June 17, 2006) -- Marines here received the opportunity to see their families living in Yuma, Ariz., through a 30-minute video teleconference call June 17.

The event, which was hosted at the Morale, Welfare and Recreation and Marine Aircraft Group 16 Headquarters buildings, afforded Marines from Marine Attack Squadron 513, MAG-16 (Reinforced), 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, the chance to do more than just hear their loved ones back home.

"The video calls are a way for me to stay in touch with my wife even though we are far apart," said Sgt. David K. Averill, aviation ordnance technician, VMA-513.
A VTC is similar to a telephone call, except the parties on both sides of the conversation can see each other through a video display.

"VTCs are better than a regular phone call because it allows us to see each other while we talk," said Averill, a native of Fairview, Okla. "Being able to see them makes all the difference in the world."

"The call went great," said Staff Sgt. Dennis L. Burkeen, staff noncommissioned officer-in-charge of airframes maintenance, VMA-513. "Being able to see your family is as close as we can come to being with them."

The family members back home are as excited as the service members are about the VTCs.

"The VTC was awesome," said Alesha, wife of Burkeen. "It was really great to let my kids see their daddy again."

In addition to being a great way to communicate with loved ones, the VTCs are also a way to raise morale throughout the squadron.

"This call is something special," said Averill. "It is a good way to boost morale. Not only for me, but for my wife as well, and that means a lot to me."

"I wanted to let my girls see their dad instead of just hearing my voice," said Burkeen, a native of Blue Island, Ill. "Pictures just don’t always cut it. Sometimes you need to see the reactions and smiles on the faces of the people you love."

"It was really fun to be able to sit down, see him and just let the girls talk to him," said Alesha. "I think it was much better than a phone call. With the VTC, he feels like a part of us and we seemed able to connect more."

"This was my first VTC," said Burkeen. "I will recommend it to anyone who asks. It takes the distance away, it almost puts you right there with your family."
------------------------------------
Iraqi Battalion Assumes Part of Iron Brigade’s Area of Operations
by Pfc. Paul J. Harris
3rd Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division PAO

AL DUJAYL, Iraq -- Iraq’s 4th Battalion, 1st Brigade, 4th Division assumed responsibility for a large portion of 1st Battalion, 8th Armor Regiment, 3rd Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Task Force Band of Brothers area of operation July 13 in a ceremony near Forward Operating Base O’Ryan.

“Let this area be proud of the Soldiers of this battalion,” said Col. Shaker Ferris Kadub, commander, 4th Battalion, 1st Brigade, 4th Iraqi Division in his opening remarks to the crowd gathered to witness the ceremony. “People will be able to sleep at night because of those brave Soldiers.”

The Iraqi battalion has been training with the Military Transition Team from 1st Bn. 8th Armor Rgt. for the past nine months to be ready for this day. The MTT trained the Iraqi Soldiers on how to conduct operations in their area and gather intelligence to fight the insurgent forces.

This unit in particular has gone about gathering intelligence during their own operations. It makes it much easier to turn over the area of operations to them. This will put the Iraqi face on the security more so than it has in the past, said Lt. Col. Jeffrey Martindale, commander, 1st Bn. 8th Armor Rgt.

The four companies of the Iraqi battalion marched in front of the review stand which included Martindale, Lt. Col. James Rice, deputy commanding officer, 3rd HBCT, and Commanding General Abdul Jabar Salah Rabah, commander, Iraqi 4th Division.

“These days are the new days of Iraq,” Abdul Jabar said. “Soldiers, be happy for this day. The people of Al Dujayl are proud of what you did for their protection.”

After Abdul Jabar spoke, Rice approached the lectern to address the crowd on behalf of the Coalition Forces.

“This ceremony marks the 4th Battalion’s place of honor in the history of the new Iraq,” Rice said. “It is a place the Soldiers and leaders have earned through hard work and dedication to the ideals of your constitution. The battalion represents the strong hand that will help the people defeat the insurgency and it will empower the civil leaders to help them execute the civil programs so necessary for growth and prosperity.”

10:58  
Anonymous Anna said...

I just sent a package off to my "Soldiers' Angel" soldier and included a half dozen beanie babies. My girls collected them and now they are sharing them.

There but for the grace of God...

16:27  
Blogger The Griper said...

hi bandit,
just a couple of questions here. what is the scuttlebutt there in regards to what the isrealis are doing in lebanon? is there any feelings of how it will affect things in iraq? i ask these questions in light of what omar had to say over in "iraq the model"

04:10  

Post a Comment

  

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home